Tuesday, November 21st, 2017

Today we are introducing a new category of posts that will contain detailed “construction logs” by everyday people in the Philippines. They are building their retirement homes. Under categories / building your dream home / philippines building projects. The posts contained within were written by their prospective authors. We just wanted to consolidate the information […]

Our Philippine house project: Roof Design We’re building our dream home in the Philippines and want it to have a Filipino flavor.  Our roof design seeks to capture a bit of the design aesthetic of the classic Philippine native house – the “bahay kubo”. Here’s a little about the architectural design of our roof.   Our roof design goes against the trend.  Increasingly elaborate roof designs are very popular, especially for houses that are or aspire to be “upscale”.  The more valleys, ridges, dormers and other complications the more impressive the house.  Bob was brought up in the northern U.S. where every valley was another spot for ice and snow to build up and cause ice dams and leaks to form,  so simple roofs are an instinctive choice. These over-complex roofs are a recent development in the Philippines.  Traditional Philippines houses had “dos aguas” or “quatro aguas” roofs.  These terms are a carryover from the Spanish “ un tejado de dos aguas”, a simple ridged roof or “ un tejado de quatro aguas” a hip roof.  The older members of my construction crew still understand and use these …

We’re building our house in the Philippines.  We build a carport as part of our Philippine house building project. A carport was a part of our original plans and permits, but we only decided to really commit to building it when our small crew started to run out of work while waiting for the house roof to be finished.  After the house roof is done, then there’s the floor to pour and finishing of the interior and exterior walls. In the meantime we could use our crew to build the carport.  Also we had over- ordered 16mm rebar …

Rebar splicing a key problem area with our Philippine house building project. Philippine buildings generally consist of steel reinforced concrete columns or posts supporting steel reinforced concrete beams with the spaces filled in with fairly weak concrete block forming the walls.  The reinforcing steel is referred to as “deformed rebar”. Ours is a one-story house, so a single standard six meter long rebar (about 20 feet) can extend from the footer (1.2 M deep) to the topmost roof beam without splicing.  That’s a good thing.  Our columns used 12mm diameter rebar. All …

How much does it cost to build a house in the Philippines?  Here’s our experience, month by month. February 20, 2010. Construction cost report for our Philippine House Project.   Thirty work days so far. Here’s what the house looks like after thirty days of work: After thirty work days… House Construction Expense – YTD:2 1/1/2010 through 2/21/2010 (in U.S. Dollars) Category Description 1/1/2010- 2/21/2010 House Construction 15,788.01 Equipment 2,345.72 Labor 2,489.01 Materials 10,104.24 Soft Costs 849.04 OVERALL TOTAL 15,788.01 H ouse Construction Expense Summary 1/1/2010 through 2/21/2010 (in U.S. Dollars) Equipment 2,345.72 Labor 2,489.01 Materials 10,104.24 Soft Costs (architecture, permits) 849.04 OVERALL TOTAL SO FAR: $15,788.01 Number of workers: 16 Current cost of cement: P212 ———————————————————————————————————————— March 12, 2010 construction expense report . Covers 45 work days since beginning of construction on January 18, 2010. House Construction Expense – YTD:2 1/1/2010 through 3/12/2010 (in U.S. Dollars) Category Description 1/1/2010- 3/12/2010 House Construction 22,843.05 Equipment 2,350.47 Labor 3,658.36 Materials 15,908.79 Soft Costs 925.43 OVERALL TOTAL 22,843.05 House after 45 days of work and about one million pesos. March 12, 2010 Total House Construction Expense to date  (in U.S. Dollars) Equipment 2,350.47 (10.29% of total) Labor…

Splicing error in roof beam rebar Our Philippine house building project: concrete roof beams.  This photo shows the 16mm rebar framework for the concrete roof beam which is supported by the columns and in turn will carry the considerable weight of the roof structure. For that see http://goiloilo.com/our-house-project-welding/ . A visit by our engineer confirmed a problem with the arrangement of the rebar in the beam.  Rebar comes in six meter lengths.  As shown in the photo, the workers spiced all the rebar in the center of the span.  The engineer directed that splices be staggered with no splices at mid-span in the bottom rebar and no splices at the support columns in the top of the beam. Everything you see above will have to be taken down and redone.  Our plans lacked a rebar splicing plan.  This has caused endless required corrections…

Building our house in the Philippines. January 31, 2010.  We’ve just ended the first two weeks of construction.  We’re generally pleased with the progress.  We have thirteen workers on our crew including two foremen.  I’m on-site most of the time so there are three “bosses”. So far we’ve spent about $8,000 including “soft costs” (architecture, permits), equipment, materials and labor.  We’d like to keep our total cost to about P15,000 per square meter or about $50,000 for the 150 square meter house.  Every day one faces decision which affect the cost.  Should we use 6″ block for a stronger house — it only costs a P30,000 pesos more!  Should the concrete floor be a bit thicker to reduce the chance of cracking?  Should we use 1/4″ thick angle bar in building our roof trusses or the thinner…

Philippine House Design.  Building our house in the Philippines. How the design for our Philippine retirement home evolved.  The original inspiration for our house was a residence we saw in Lucban, Quezon Province.  It was a new house but had a traditional Filipino and Spanish Colonial flair.  Bob worked in the field of hertiage preservation for almost 25 years and has an affection for traditional design. Excellent new construction on plaza in Lucban, Quezon Province, Philippines When we added some elements we wanted like a second floor verandah, this is what we got: Perspective Drawing for our Tigbauan House But we reluctantly abandoned these plans for a rather basic one story design similar to to a plan we had seen at SOS Children’s Village in Zarraga, Iloilo: Cottage – SOS Children's Village, Iloilo Here’s what we…

Our Philippine house building project in Tigbauan, Iloilo. Today we had 150 cubic meters of fill delivered to our lot.  This particular …

Lunar New Year Celebration, China Bank Mabini Branch, Iloilo City. At smaller branches…